zerostatereflex

zerostatereflex:

"It can not be an accident that our evolution has given us this potential, evolution gives us nothing, unless it is useful, and it therefore suggests that these altered states of consciousness are incredibly useful to the human species."

Graham Hancock

"Another interesting thing about ayahuasca is that there is nothing in it that doesn’t occur within the ordinary human brain, there’s just more of the ordinary brain chemistry there. So that implies that these extraordinary states of mind, group mindedness, three-dimensional hallucinations, and so forth are never the less not that far removed from ordinary states of brain chemistry."

Terrance McKenna

 

carladoll6
carladoll6:

thegodmolecule:


here is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.And then, when the mother is pregnant, the mother teaches that child’s song to the midwives and the old women of the village, so that when the child is born, the old women and the people around her sing the child’s song to welcome it. And then, as the child grows up, the other villagers are taught the child’s song. If the child falls, or hurts its knee, someone picks it up and sings its song to it. Or perhaps the child does something wonderful, or goes through the rites of puberty, then as a way of honoring this person, the people of the village sing his or her song.In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another.And it goes this way through their life. In marriage, the songs are sung, together. And finally, when this child is lying in bed, ready to die, all the villagers know his or her song, and they sing—for the last time—the song to that person.You may not have grown up in an African tribe that sings your song to you at crucial life transitions, but life is always reminding you when you are in tune with yourself and when you are not. When you feel good, what you are doing matches your song, and when you feel awful, it doesn’t. In the end, we shall all recognize our song and sing it well. You may feel a little warbly at the moment, but so have all the great singers. Just keep singing and you’ll find your way home.
 

This is so sweet.

carladoll6:

thegodmolecule:

here is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.

And then, when the mother is pregnant, the mother teaches that child’s song to the midwives and the old women of the village, so that when the child is born, the old women and the people around her sing the child’s song to welcome it. And then, as the child grows up, the other villagers are taught the child’s song. If the child falls, or hurts its knee, someone picks it up and sings its song to it. Or perhaps the child does something wonderful, or goes through the rites of puberty, then as a way of honoring this person, the people of the village sing his or her song.



In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.



The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another.

And it goes this way through their life. In marriage, the songs are sung, together. And finally, when this child is lying in bed, ready to die, all the villagers know his or her song, and they sing—for the last time—the song to that person.

You may not have grown up in an African tribe that sings your song to you at crucial life transitions, but life is always reminding you when you are in tune with yourself and when you are not. When you feel good, what you are doing matches your song, and when you feel awful, it doesn’t. In the end, we shall all recognize our song and sing it well. You may feel a little warbly at the moment, but so have all the great singers. Just keep singing and you’ll find your way home.

 

This is so sweet.

curiositycounts
One of the great myths of the school system is that we tell people that everyone should learn exactly the same thing and exactly the same way, at roughly exactly the same speed. And that’s just not true. People learn in different ways, at different speeds, at different times. And so hacking your education allows you to learn what, when, how and where you want.

Dale J. Stephens, author of Hacking Your Education and founder of UnCollege.org

via NPR

(via curiositycounts)

curiositycounts
Know your vegetables in the right season! great set of posters to put in kitchen, for veggies, fruits and herbs!
curiositycounts:

If you’ve dabbled in urban farming or tested the greenness of your thumb, then (hopefully) you know the excitement of seeing plants stay alive! Let’s take that a step further and assume they produce veggies and fruit — congratulations!
With progress like that, you’ll soon need this series of infographics for Fruits, Veggies and Herbs and when they’re in season. 

Know your vegetables in the right season! great set of posters to put in kitchen, for veggies, fruits and herbs!

curiositycounts:

If you’ve dabbled in urban farming or tested the greenness of your thumb, then (hopefully) you know the excitement of seeing plants stay alive! Let’s take that a step further and assume they produce veggies and fruit — congratulations!

With progress like that, you’ll soon need this series of infographics for Fruits, Veggies and Herbs and when they’re in season.
 

curiositycounts
curiositycounts:

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this composite of the Perseids Meteor Shower truly  illustrates how fast Earth is moving and how much it encounters. 
As our friends over at It’s Okay To Be Smart explain, “this long exposure shot by David Kingham as a friendly reminder that we are orbiting the Sun at 67,000 miles per hour, rocketing around the center of the Milky Way at 490,000 miles per hour, and traveling towards the constellation Leo at a blistering 390 kilometers per second.
That means that we happen to pass through the thin, dusty tails of comets long passed, like Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids’ source, we shouldn’t be surprised to see a few fireworks.”
For any who missed its debut last weekend, you’re in luck! These showers stick around for an estimated three weeks as a kick off to ‘Meteor Season’ which lasts through December.
Happy stargazing.
(via Kottke)

curiositycounts:

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this composite of the Perseids Meteor Shower truly  illustrates how fast Earth is moving and how much it encounters. 

As our friends over at It’s Okay To Be Smart explain, “this long exposure shot by David Kingham as a friendly reminder that we are orbiting the Sun at 67,000 miles per hour, rocketing around the center of the Milky Way at 490,000 miles per hour, and traveling towards the constellation Leo at a blistering 390 kilometers per second.

That means that we happen to pass through the thin, dusty tails of comets long passed, like Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids’ source, we shouldn’t be surprised to see a few fireworks.”

For any who missed its debut last weekend, you’re in luck! These showers stick around for an estimated three weeks as a kick off to ‘Meteor Season’ which lasts through December.

Happy stargazing.

(via Kottke)