carladoll6
carladoll6:

thegodmolecule:


here is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.And then, when the mother is pregnant, the mother teaches that child’s song to the midwives and the old women of the village, so that when the child is born, the old women and the people around her sing the child’s song to welcome it. And then, as the child grows up, the other villagers are taught the child’s song. If the child falls, or hurts its knee, someone picks it up and sings its song to it. Or perhaps the child does something wonderful, or goes through the rites of puberty, then as a way of honoring this person, the people of the village sing his or her song.In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another.And it goes this way through their life. In marriage, the songs are sung, together. And finally, when this child is lying in bed, ready to die, all the villagers know his or her song, and they sing—for the last time—the song to that person.You may not have grown up in an African tribe that sings your song to you at crucial life transitions, but life is always reminding you when you are in tune with yourself and when you are not. When you feel good, what you are doing matches your song, and when you feel awful, it doesn’t. In the end, we shall all recognize our song and sing it well. You may feel a little warbly at the moment, but so have all the great singers. Just keep singing and you’ll find your way home.
 

This is so sweet.

carladoll6:

thegodmolecule:

here is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.

And then, when the mother is pregnant, the mother teaches that child’s song to the midwives and the old women of the village, so that when the child is born, the old women and the people around her sing the child’s song to welcome it. And then, as the child grows up, the other villagers are taught the child’s song. If the child falls, or hurts its knee, someone picks it up and sings its song to it. Or perhaps the child does something wonderful, or goes through the rites of puberty, then as a way of honoring this person, the people of the village sing his or her song.



In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.



The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another.

And it goes this way through their life. In marriage, the songs are sung, together. And finally, when this child is lying in bed, ready to die, all the villagers know his or her song, and they sing—for the last time—the song to that person.

You may not have grown up in an African tribe that sings your song to you at crucial life transitions, but life is always reminding you when you are in tune with yourself and when you are not. When you feel good, what you are doing matches your song, and when you feel awful, it doesn’t. In the end, we shall all recognize our song and sing it well. You may feel a little warbly at the moment, but so have all the great singers. Just keep singing and you’ll find your way home.

 

This is so sweet.

curiositycounts
One of the great myths of the school system is that we tell people that everyone should learn exactly the same thing and exactly the same way, at roughly exactly the same speed. And that’s just not true. People learn in different ways, at different speeds, at different times. And so hacking your education allows you to learn what, when, how and where you want.

Dale J. Stephens, author of Hacking Your Education and founder of UnCollege.org

via NPR

(via curiositycounts)

curiositycounts
Know your vegetables in the right season! great set of posters to put in kitchen, for veggies, fruits and herbs!
curiositycounts:

If you’ve dabbled in urban farming or tested the greenness of your thumb, then (hopefully) you know the excitement of seeing plants stay alive! Let’s take that a step further and assume they produce veggies and fruit — congratulations!
With progress like that, you’ll soon need this series of infographics for Fruits, Veggies and Herbs and when they’re in season. 

Know your vegetables in the right season! great set of posters to put in kitchen, for veggies, fruits and herbs!

curiositycounts:

If you’ve dabbled in urban farming or tested the greenness of your thumb, then (hopefully) you know the excitement of seeing plants stay alive! Let’s take that a step further and assume they produce veggies and fruit — congratulations!

With progress like that, you’ll soon need this series of infographics for Fruits, Veggies and Herbs and when they’re in season.
 

curiositycounts
curiositycounts:

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this composite of the Perseids Meteor Shower truly  illustrates how fast Earth is moving and how much it encounters. 
As our friends over at It’s Okay To Be Smart explain, “this long exposure shot by David Kingham as a friendly reminder that we are orbiting the Sun at 67,000 miles per hour, rocketing around the center of the Milky Way at 490,000 miles per hour, and traveling towards the constellation Leo at a blistering 390 kilometers per second.
That means that we happen to pass through the thin, dusty tails of comets long passed, like Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids’ source, we shouldn’t be surprised to see a few fireworks.”
For any who missed its debut last weekend, you’re in luck! These showers stick around for an estimated three weeks as a kick off to ‘Meteor Season’ which lasts through December.
Happy stargazing.
(via Kottke)

curiositycounts:

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this composite of the Perseids Meteor Shower truly  illustrates how fast Earth is moving and how much it encounters. 

As our friends over at It’s Okay To Be Smart explain, “this long exposure shot by David Kingham as a friendly reminder that we are orbiting the Sun at 67,000 miles per hour, rocketing around the center of the Milky Way at 490,000 miles per hour, and traveling towards the constellation Leo at a blistering 390 kilometers per second.

That means that we happen to pass through the thin, dusty tails of comets long passed, like Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids’ source, we shouldn’t be surprised to see a few fireworks.”

For any who missed its debut last weekend, you’re in luck! These showers stick around for an estimated three weeks as a kick off to ‘Meteor Season’ which lasts through December.

Happy stargazing.

(via Kottke)

Check out this great landmark film narrated by Jeremy Irons.

Find out more at seedsoffreedom.info

Seeds of Freedom charts the story of seed from its roots at the heart of traditional, diversity rich farming systems across the world, to being transformed into a powerful commodity, used to monopolise the global food system.The film highlights the extent to which the industrial agricultural system, and genetically modified (GM) seeds in particular, has impacted on the enormous agro -biodiversity evolved by farmers and communities around the world, since the beginning of agriculture.

Seeds of Freedom seeks to challenge the mantra that large-scale, industrial agriculture is the only means by which we can feed the world, promoted by the pro-GM lobby. In tracking the story of seed it becomes clear how corporate agenda has driven the take over of seed in order to make vast profit and control of the food global system.

Through interviews with leading international experts such as Dr Vandana Shiva and  Henk Hobbelink, and through the voices of a number of African farmers, the film highlights how the loss of indigenous seed goes hand in hand with loss of biodiversity and related knowledge; the loss of cultural traditions and practices; the loss of livelihoods; and the loss of food sovereignty.  The pressure is growing to replace the diverse, nutritional, locally adapted and resilient seed crops which have been bred by small-scale farmers for millenia, by monocultures of GM seed.

Alongside speakers from indigenous farming communities, the film features global experts and activists Dr Vandana Shiva of Navdanya, Henk Hobbelink of GRAIN, Zac Goldsmith MP (UK Conservative party), Canadian farmer Percy Schmeiser, Kumi Naidoo of Greenpeace International, Gathuru Mburu of the African Biodiversity Network, Liz Hosken of The Gaia Foundation and Caroline Lucas MP (UK Green party).

This film is co-produced by  The Gaia Foundation and the African Biodiversity Network. In collaboration with GRAIN, Navdanya International and MELCA Ethiopia .

curiositycounts

We tend to rewrite the histories of technological innovation, making myths about a guy who had a great idea that changed the world. In reality, though, innovation isn’t the goal; it’s everything that gets you there. It’s bad financial decisions and blueprints for machines that weren’t built until decades later. It’s the important leaps forward that synthesize lots of ideas, and it’s the belly-up failures that teach us what not to do.

When we ignore how innovation actually works, we make it hard to see what’s happening right in front of us today. If you don’t know that the incandescent light was a failure before it was a success, it’s easy to write off some modern energy innovations — like solar panels — because they haven’t hit the big time fast enough.

Worse, the fairy-tale view of history implies that innovation has an end. It doesn’t. What we want and what we need keeps changing. The incandescent light was a 19th-century failure and a 20th- century success. Now it’s a failure again, edged out by new technologies, like LEDs, that were, themselves, failures for many years.

That’s what this issue is about: all the little failures, trivialities and not-quite-solved mysteries that make the successes possible. This is what innovation looks like. It’s messy, and it’s awesome.

Maggie Koerth-Baker, 32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow
June 1, 2012 New York Times (via curiositycounts)